Four Dream Film Nights

As Scalarama kicks off, our staff-picked film nights will become a fixture of the Bar Paragon for a few weeks. Creative combinations like A Clockwork Orange & Funny Games (‘Bit of the Old Ultraviolence’), La Dolce Vita & The Great Beauty (‘Roma Bellezza!’) and a DJ set with Only God Forgives & Under the Skin ‘A Scanner Darkly’) will contribute towards a hell of a good time to be a film geek.

However, as awesome as our picks are, we had to operate within the boundaries of reality to put all this together. There are some ideas for film nights that are so impossibly fantastic, that they could only occupy our wildest dreams. Here’re four fantasy film nights for you to muse over.

1 – 2001: A Space Odyssey with Stanley Kubrick Q&A

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There are no prizes for guessing why this is impossible – the icon passed away in 1999. And, even if he were alive, Kubrick was a recluse, who only stepped out of his Harpenden home to make his wonderful movies. One film that’s nearly as mysterious as the life of Stanley Kubrick is his sci-fi masterpiece, 2001: A Space Odyssey. Since it came out nearly 50 years ago, it’s been as misunderstood as it has been universally admired. There are transcripts out there of Kubrick explaining the plot – he hints that it tracks a case of extra-terrestrial surveillance. Yet, he also states, rightfully, that part of the beauty of the film is this inability to comprehend or understand – much like the depth of space. Imagine if we could have a Q&A with Kubrick after a show of the famous film! The dare-devil questioner could even ask about the conspiracy theory that 2001:A Space Odyssey was screened by the government before hiring Kubrick to film the moon landing. Scandalous!

2 – The Good, The Bad, The Ugly & Once Upon a Time in the West with Ennio Morricone Live Orchestra

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Anyone who knows their cinema, will know that Italian maestro, Ennio Morricone, is one of the most prolific score composers of all time. His partnership with director Sergio Leone was synonymous with the Spaghetti Western movement in the 60s and 70s. Morricone’s stirring soundtracks immortalised the Western shootout, and ushered the new technique in which films are edited around music, rather than the other way around. With 500 scores under his belt, the scope of the 85-year-olds work is staggering. The Good, The Bad, The Ugly & Once Upon a Time in the West are perhaps his most emblematic works, and it would be a trip to see him conduct live as the films play. While we accept this is technically possible, Morricone’s touring is starting to die down, and we couldn’t see him doing such a thing at his age. How wonderful it would be, though.

3 – Open-Air screening of ‘The Godfather’ Trilogy in Sicily

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Open-air cinema has boomed in London in the past year, and there’s a reason. It makes movie-watching a social experience, and gives a fantastic opportunity to meld the film with a special location. Such 4D experiences are tough to come by, and have to be done right. That’s why Coppoloa’s Godfather Trilogy played in the sweeping environs of the Sicilian countryside would be exhilarating. Although, after Apollonia’s demise in Part One, you may think twice about starting your engine on the way home. Nevertheless, this wonderful possibility, though maddeningly impractical, would be an experience of a lifetime.

4 – ‘Gravity’ In Space

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Now, here’s one that would be both extraordinary and terrifying. Cuaron’s sci-fi picture about a woman being lost in space was a testament to the immense terror of space, and how it can be captured with the camera. If, some time in the not-so-distant future, commercial space travel becomes a thing, imagine if we could watch Gravity while drifting through the atmosphere. It wouldn’t be for the faint-hearted, but it would be a rare and stupefying experience.

Our Scalarama shows are going on all month! To book some free tickets, visit our eventbrite.

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